Community

“Village Concept” viable for our villages?” a report presented at the Art of Aging/of Dying series, Dec. 12


Is the Village Concept viable for our villages? A report about the village concept will be presented at the Art of Aging/of Dying series at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita on Tuesday, Dec. 12, from 3 to 5 p.m.

For several months, a steering committee has been investigating the possibilities for creation of a Village hub organization for our local communities. The Village steering committee includes both long-time and newer area residents. Members of the committee will report their findings and ideas at the Dec. 12 Art of Aging series, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Hoffman Center for the Arts. Fee is $5.

What do we mean by “Village Concept?”

The Village concept is a model for organizing neighbors helping neighbors coordinate and deliver services for older adults so they can remain living in their own homes and active in their communities. A “Village” is a membership program that provides access to vetted professional services and to volunteer assistance, embracing a variety of preferences and needs. Typical Village services and volunteer opportunities include help with transportation, home repairs, household chores, yard chores, information referral and tech assistance.

As the majority residents in the villages of Neahkahnie, Manzanita, Nehalem and Wheeler are over the age of 55, and recognizing that some services older adults rely upon in urban areas are not available in our rural environment, a locally organized “village” service hub could improve the likelihood that residents will find ways to remain in the community. While the model was developed with older adults in mind, the committee recognizes there are challenges for young adults who wish to live in our small communities, and that the Village model could provide for reciprocal services and support across generations.

“Nobody is completely independent. Sometimes in our lives we help a lot and we don’t need a lot in return. Other times we need a lot, and it’s okay to ask.”

— Mary Howe, Village Santa Cruz

“Health benefits are higher within Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORCs) where physical and social environments facilitate greater activity and promote feelings of well-being.”

— Paul Masotti, PhD American Journal of Public Health July 2006

“Village members experience reduced isolation, increased independence, and enhanced purpose of life. These feet on the street resources, focused on social determinants of health, positively improve population health.”

— Village to Village website

Find out what the steering committee has to report and how you can get involved in Village development.

The event will be held at Hoffman Center for the Arts; 594 Laneda Avenue, Manzanita, OR from 3-5 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017. There is a $5 fee to attend.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). Further information is available at www.hoffmanblog.org online or contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com